Skip to main content

Recent enquiries

inkstand

Some recent examples of requests for help from members of the public.

Quart Mug Marks

Enquiry

 

I bought this quart pot at an auction online. I would like to know if the date 1888 with VR and a crown means the pot was made in 1888.  The dates on the other side (1906 thru'1910) are presumably verification marks at subsequent inspections. Also, what is the significance of the number 64 after VR, ER  and GR and the number 7/30 after GR64?

Many thanks in anticipation for any help you can give me.

Best regards

Quart mug with more verification marks

Answer from the enquiry team

Many thanks for your email to the Pewter Society of Great Britain for which I have attached a reply I hope will be of interest.

 

This appears to be a straight sided British quart mug with copious Excise marks including two; “crown VR 64” and “crown ER 64” struck by the authorities in Sunderland both after 1878 when that numerical style was introduced but with the dates others were struck surrounding them.  The number “1800” above ‘Crown ER 64” seems too early however. 

 

The date “1888” is just another excise mark struck that year but if you look in the inside of the base you may find the makers mark (k/as a touch mark) amid all the oxide and crud which accumulates there over time.  Gently probing with a soft piece of wood such as a lolly stick so as not to damage any writing that may be there may help and if this is successful do not hesitate to come back for further information.

 

Any information supplied represents an opinion based on the original information and/or images provided and whilst we believe that the information below to be sound, we cannot guarantee this as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly being updated by new research   It is for the sole use of the owner of the item(s) in question to advance his/her knowledge/and under the terms of the offer displayed on the Pewter Society website and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited. It is expressly forbidden for any mention of the Pewter Society or any of its named members to be used in connection with any such sale or offer for sale or in descriptive text. Please note we reserve the right to use your enquiry anonymously in our recent enquires section on the website

Half Pint Measure

ENQUIRY

Interesting item sent in from a Local Aid Charity

Half Pint Measure Full

Answer from the enquiry team

This is a half pint measure of unusual shape and features with a truncated cone shaped body and plain “C” strap handle but an impressive brass oval disc on the front giving the capacity and a Wolverhampton “65” numerical Excise Mark first used  after 1878 but from the letters “Crown GR” after 1910 in the reign of George V.

 

The Society does not give valuations but if you take the item to an auctioneer dealing in antiques, and ideally one specialising in pewter such as Charles Hanson of Etwall, Derbyshire, they will state a price at which they would offer it for sale for free in the hopes that you leave it with them  but I must add that I have never seen such a measure before and it should have some rarity value.

Any information supplied represents an opinion based on the original information and/or images provided and whilst we believe that the information below to be sound, we cannot guarantee this as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly being updated by new research   It is for the sole use of the owner of the item(s) in question to advance his/her knowledge/and under the terms of the offer displayed on the Pewter Society website and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited. It is expressly forbidden for any mention of the Pewter Society or any of its named members to be used in connection with any such sale or offer for sale or in descriptive text. Please note we reserve the right to use your enquiry anonymously in our recent enquires section on the website

 

 

 We are pleased to have received your enquiry.  We welcome new members and if you think in the future that you would like to join our Society, full details can be found on our website.

Gaydon Church Bowl

Enquiry

Dear Sir

I would be grateful if you would look at the enclosed photographs and give me an opinion on the likely date of this pewter  bowl. For your information it was found amongst the spoil and mud dredged up from a lake near to Gaydon, a village in Warwickshire, whose property it now is. I have heard a suggestion that it might be a baptism bowl, part of equipment used by priests to baptise very young children near to death. The diameter of the bowl is one foot.The height just over 3 inches. Any information would be much appreciated.

Gaydon Church Bowl Front

Answer from the enquiry team

 

This is a cast pewter plain dish/bowl with no apparent pewterers touch mark on the reverse but struck with the donors ungrammatical statement possibly as a useful collection plate or possibly a font liner for use in the local Church in Gaydon.   It has therefore not been possible to date it accurately but most possibly mid eighteenth century or even earlier. 

Any information supplied represents an opinion based on the original information and/or images provided and whilst we believe that the information below to be sound, we cannot guarantee this as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly being updated by new research   It is for the sole use of the owner of the item(s) in question to advance his/her knowledge/and under the terms of the offer displayed on the Pewter Society website and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited. It is expressly forbidden for any mention of the Pewter Society or any of its named members to be used in connection with any such sale or offer for sale or in descriptive text. Please note we reserve the right to use your enquiry anonymously in our recent enquires section on the website

 

Shaving Mug

ENQUIRY

 

 

I’m currently working with the Teviot Museum eHive project in Roxburgh, Central Otago, New Zealand.

One item in the museum's collection is a pewter shaving mug believed to be English and would have been brought over with the early settlers in the area. 

I’ve attached some images of the mug and the marks on the base in the hope you may have something in your database :-)

Thank you.

Bowett Makers Mark

Answer from the enquiry team

 

This is an English shaving mug made by Alfred Browett with their Lion trademark. It is Britannia metal electro plated with silver. Britannia metal is a lead free form of pewter popular at this time due to its ease of forming. I have found a trade advertisement for the firm shown above from around 1878. Before 1886 the firm became Browett, Ashberry & Co so we have a good fix on the date of manufacture.

Alfred Browett Advertisment

Any information supplied represents an opinion based on the original information and/or images provided and whilst we believe that the information below to be sound, we cannot guarantee this as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly being updated by new research   It is for the sole use of the owner of the item(s) in question to advance his/her knowledge/and under the terms of the offer displayed on the Pewter Society website and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited. It is expressly forbidden for any mention of the Pewter Society or any of its named members to be used in connection with any such sale or offer for sale or in descriptive text. Please note we reserve the right to use your enquiry anonymously in our recent enquires section on the website

Pair of Sconces

ENQUIRY

 

Hi,

       I was wondering if anyone could help me with identifying pewter marks on a couple of items.  They are pewter plates made into sconces that were passed down from at least my great grandparents.  If particularly old, they may have been passed down from family that came from the Weymouth area in England in the 17th or 18th century.  They are scalloped edge pewter plates, about 10" in diameter, with candle sconces attached.  I am attaching pictures of the pieces overall, front and back, as well as pictures of partial pewter marks.  The marks seem to be the same mark on each plate, but a different partiality is visible on the different plates.  And the marks are badly worn.  Nevertheless, any assistance your Society could provide would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks in advance for your reply.

Marks on the sconces

Answer from the enquiry team

 

This pair of wall sconces are made out of a pair of wavy edged five lobed cast pewter plates, one seemingly slightly larger than the other, with candle holders soldered on.  Such plates are more commonly found on the European Continent, particularly in the nineteenth century and the faint marks could well be those of two unidentified Continental pewterers.  The addition of the “London” labels and the word “England” struck over the top were most probably added by the British pewterer who adapted them in this way around 1910 (or later) when this wording was first brought into use by law in Britain.   

Rear of Sconces

Any information supplied represents an opinion based on the original information and/or images provided and whilst we believe that the information below to be sound, we cannot guarantee this as we have not inspected the item, and our knowledge of pewter and pewterers is constantly being updated by new research   It is for the sole use of the owner of the item(s) in question to advance his/her knowledge/and under the terms of the offer displayed on the Pewter Society website and any information given cannot be used in connection with the sale or offer for sale of any item about which the information is solicited. It is expressly forbidden for any mention of the Pewter Society or any of its named members to be used in connection with any such sale or offer for sale or in descriptive text. Please note we reserve the right to use your enquiry anonymously in our recent enquires section on the website